Broadband

DP

The Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) has released its much vaunted, year long, study “Spreading the benefits of Digital Participation”, its blueprint for universal digital participation in Scotland. It stipulates three priority areas - access, motivation and skills development.

The internet needs to be a safe place
BBC online story

Wales is not making the most of a £425m contract to roll out superfast broadband in rural areas, according to the former head of BT in Wales.

John Davies, who is now Chair of Ofcom's Advisory Committee for Wales, says more needs to be spent on marketing the project, which is heavily backed with public money.

Mr Davies said the project was transformative but more needed to be done to make people aware of when it is rolled out in their communities to encourage demand for the high-speed broadband.

Superfast Cymru scheme replaces copper lines with fibre cables
Welsh face

Russell George (@russ_george) was elected as the Welsh Conservative AM for Montgomeryshire in 2011. He owns a retail business in Newtown town centre. He was elected to Powys County Council in 2008. He is the chair of the Assembly’s Cross Party Group for Digital Communication and Shadow Minister for Agriculture & Natural Resources.

Heightened political interest in communications issues
cheap tablet

Wouldn’t it be great if Scotland could be a world leader in digital inclusion, instead of always playing catch-up?

Wouldn’t it be great if Scotland could be a world leader in digital inclusion, instead of always playing catch-up?
Tortoise

Ofcom's Advisory Committee for England will be revisiting an issue that continues to be unresolved: How fast must internet speeds be to meet our needs in Britain?

We know there are discrepancies in speed of networks within Britain, such as between deep rural and urban areas.

These are relatively straightforward to discuss on such criteria as equity, and efforts to enable rural areas to develop a digital economy, and not disadvantage businesses, such as B&Bs in rural areas, where the lack of broadband connections can undermine their viability.

Expect the unexpected and plan for it...
Slugger

Slugger O’Toole is a news and opinion blog which takes a critical look at regional, national and international politics.

User-friendly approach needed
train

Wonderful that Ofcom is proposing to introduce incremental changes in spectrum use that could encourage the development of satellite-based Internet services linked to Earth Stations on Mobile Platforms (ESOMPs).*

SATELLITES

Apparently, ships, trains and other moving vehicles including planes can better track orbiting satellites – closer to the earth than geo-stationary satellites – and obtain Internet services while on the move.

but more innovation required
scotland_flag_digital.jpg

The Advisory Committee for Scotland (ACS) discusses a wide range of questions each year as part of its regular advice to Ofcom.

When Ofcom’s annual Communications Market Report (CMR) on Scotland is being compiled, we always comment on the findings before they become public. Now that the CMR for Scotland been published, it’s worth highlighting a few key issues.

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Local issues brought into sharp focus
fibre optics

There has been considerable press coverage on the quality and competitiveness of broadband communication infrastructures in England and the UK as a whole.

See: The Register

ACE will ask for an up-date on this issue and ways in which regulation is tied into the issues being raised. We'd welcome input from those with constructive suggestions on these issues.

There has been considerable press coverage on the quality and competitiveness of broadband communication infrastructures in England and the UK as a whole
scotland_flag_digital.jpg

An upcoming conference on ‘Digital Scotland’ promises to ‘bring together the perspectives of the Scottish government, civic & local authorities, community leaders and key business enterprises to work towards the Government’s 2020 vision of having a world-class digital infrastructure'.

Smart cities, rural challenges, applications of the future, digital services and mobile technologies will all be discussed. The conference is a key activity in Scotland’s Digital Dialogue programme of events.

Smart cities and rural challenges
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